Tag Archive for ‘RAS-ACS Symposium essay contest’

RAS-ACS Symposium essays

RAS-ACS Symposium essays: Residents debate the future of leadership in surgery

The topic of this year’s Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons Symposium was Reframing Surgical Leadership in 2017: Surgeon-Scientist or Surgeon-Advocate? The following are the second place essays submitted on both sides of the debate.

RAS-ACS Symposium essays

Reframing surgical leadership in 2017: Surgeon-scientist or surgeon-advocate? Surgeon-scientist

The second-place essay for the Surgeon-Scientist. The topic of this year’s Resident and Associate Society  Symposium was Reframing Surgical Leadership in 2017: Surgeon-Scientist or Surgeon-Advocate?

RAS-ACS Symposium essays

Reframing surgical leadership in 2017: Surgeon-scientist or surgeon-advocate? Surgeon-advocate

The second-place essay for the Surgeon-Advocate. The topic of this year’s Resident and Associate Society  Symposium was Reframing Surgical Leadership in 2017: Surgeon-Scientist or Surgeon-Advocate?

RAS-ACS

RAS-ACS Symposium essays: Residents debate the boundaries of surgeon disclosure

The topic of this year’s Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons Symposium was Exploring the Limits of Surgeon Disclosure: Where Are the Boundaries? Read the first place essays submitted from both sides of the debate.

RAS-ACS

Exploring the limits of surgeon disclosure: Where are the boundaries? First-place essay—Pro

This essay supports a critical analysis of how to achieve  true informed consent from surgical patients and the effects of surgeon disclosure.

RAS-ACS

Exploring the limits of surgeon disclosure: Where are the boundaries? First-place essay—Con

This essay suggests that without conclusive evidence to confirm outcomes, surgeon disclosure might pander to public fears rather than improve patient safety.

RAS-ACS Symposium essays—Social media: Threat to professionalism and privacy or essential for current surgical practice?

The topic of this year’s Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons Symposium was Social Media—Threat to Professionalism and Privacy or Essential for Current Surgical Practice. The following are the first and second place essays submitted from both sides of the debate.

First-place essay—Pro: Social media: An essential tool for the academic surgeon

This article discusses how social media, when used appropriately, is an essential tool for the academic surgeon.

First-place essay—Con: The writing is on the (Facebook) wall: The threat posed by social media

The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a line, Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.1 —Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám Social media, the hallmark of Web 2.0, refers to virtual Internet communities where user-generated content (photos, videos, […]

RAS-ACS Symposium essays: Residents debate whether to reform or revolutionize surgical training

The topic for this year’s 2014 Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons (RAS-ACS) symposium competition was the Five-Year General Surgery Residency: Reform vs. Revolution. The following are the first and second place essays submitted from both sides of the debate.

RAS-ACS Symposium essays: Residents debate pros and cons of online patient rankings

Each year, the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons (RAS-ACS) hosts a symposium at the Clinical Congress featuring a debate on a timely issue in surgical training or practice. In addition to the symposium debate, the RAS-ACS Issues Committee coordinates an essay competition open to all RAS members. The topic for this year’s symposium and essay competition was Patient Rankings: Should Patient Feedback Affect Our Pay and Delivery of Care? The top “pro” and “con” essayists are invited to serve as panelists at the symposium, and the second-place pro and con essays are featured in the Bulletin.

RAS Issues Symposium: Surgery at the end of life: For love or money?

To operate, or not to operate—that is the question. Data show that in 2008, among Medicare beneficiaries in the final year of life, nearly one in three underwent a surgical procedure. Nearly one in five had surgery in the last month of life, and nearly one in 10 had surgery in the last week of life. Why do we operate on these patients? Does the availability of hospital beds influence surgeons to operate more frequently? Perhaps—but the reasons surgeons operate are more complicated than these data would suggest.

RAS Issues Symposium: Reining in the scalpel

Recent articles in the mainstream press indicate a growing public awareness that end-of-life procedures are overused. As surgeons, we know that the decision to perform surgery at the end of life is difficult, and there is no shortage of manuscripts delving into this complex topic. From this author’s perspective, end-of-life operations, specifically in the elderly, are overused and do little to lengthen or improve quality of life and, indeed, often cause more harm than good.

RAS Issues Symposium: An argument against heroic intervention

Recent articles in the mainstream press indicate a growing public awareness that end-of-life procedures are overused. As surgeons, we know that the decision to perform surgery at the end of life is difficult, and there is no shortage of manuscripts delving into this complex topic. From this author’s perspective, end-of-life operations, specifically in the elderly, are overused and do little to lengthen or improve quality of life and, indeed, often cause more harm than good.

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