Tag Archive for ‘RAS-ACS essays’

RAS-ACS

The 2017 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest: An introduction

The theme of the 2017 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest was Be True to the Profession; Be True to Yourself.

Robert A . Swendiman

The 2017 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest: Gravitas

Robert A. Swendiman, MD, MPP, the 2017 RAS Communications Committee essay winner,  describes how taking time to heal after the loss of a child led him to struggle with the decision to put his personal life first.

RAS-ACS

The 2016 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest: An introduction

The theme of the 2016 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest was Paying It Forward: When the Mentee Becomes the Mentor.

Dr. Kevin Koo

First-place essay: Paying it forward: When the mentee becomes the mentor

Kevin Koo, MD, MPH, MPhil, the 2016 RAS Communications Committee essay winner, describes how his experiences as a student with strong mentors have shaped how he works with junior members of the operating team today.

The 2015 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest: An introduction

The 2015 RAS-ACS annual Communications Committee essay contest focused on “the hidden curriculum in surgery.”

First-place essay: The things I carry

Krista Terracina, MD, the 2015 RAS Communications Committee essay winner, describes how patient interactions have influenced her career as a surgeon.

The 2014 RAS-ACS annual essay contest: When I want to quit and why I don’t

Each year, the Communications Committee of the RAS-ACS selects a topic of broad interest to young surgeons and solicits from interested members brief essays on the subject. This year’s theme—When I Want to Quit and Why I Don’t—highlights the benefits and challenges of being a surgeon.

The patient’s wound I carry with me

This essay underscores the lasting effect  an  individual patient—in this case a surgical amputee—can have on surgical residents.

Why we stay: For the patients yet to come

Keeping an inventory of the positives and negatives of a general surgery residency inspires this surgeon to pursue her chosen field.

Commitment

Personal and professional struggles solidify a resident’s determination to persevere and complete the program.

A chosen path

Overcoming emotional adversity, specifically a spouse’s illness, prepares this surgeon to understand the emotional challenges that her patients face.

Anecdotes

This essay reveals the power of gratitude and its effect on surgical residents.

RAS-ACS cover

2012 RAS-ACS essay contest: Treating the Difficult Patient

Each year, the Communications Committee of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons (RAS-ACS) selects a topic of interest to young surgeons and solicits essays from RAS-ACS members. Essays are judged by a panel of Communications Committee members, and the author of the winning essay receives $500. In addition, that essay and other leading submissions are published in the Bulletin. Unfortunately, the papers from the 2012 essay contest on Treating the Difficult Patient were never published. The Bulletin is pleased to present them now in this special supplement.

Annual RAS-ACS essay contest: Dealing with surgical complications

Each year, the Communications Committee of the RAS-ACS selects a topic of broad interest to young surgeons and solicits brief essays from interested members on the subject. This year’s topic—How Surgeons Deal with Complications—generated a robust response from RAS-ACS membership.

Accepting accountability and moving forward

This year’s winning essay by Elisha G. Brownson, MD, details lessons learned from a case involving a lucid patient and a snapped catheter.

Responding to, reflecting on, and moving forward from a surgical complication

Complications related to a stapled right gastroepiploic pedicle are the focus of this resident’s essay that urges surgeons to be transparent with patients and colleagues, reflect on errors, and forgive themselves.

Talk it out, and slow it down

Discussing reactions to cases involving surgical complications should not leave surgeons feeling embarrassed or denigrated, according to the author of this essay, who urges surgeons to express their feelings to achieve understanding and self-awareness.

Mea maxima culpa—Dealing with surgical complications

How surgeons conduct themselves when confronted with the reality of an undesirable surgery-related event is the focus of this essay. With each of these events, notes the author “rests an opportunity for the surgeon to be inquisitive, to be transparent, to be introspective, and to learn from the moment at hand.”

Consequences

This essay brings to life the emotional responses involved with surgical complications, both on the part of the surgeon and the family.

Complications are shared experiences

Surgeons have a complex relationship with their patients, one marked by the common goal of a positive outcome, observes the author of this essay, and when failures occur, surgeons and patients are urged to grieve and rebound together.

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