Tag Archive for ‘global health care’

Figure 1. The Surgical Staircase

Surgical training, global surgery, and a generally applicable training model

The Surgicon Project and its  global surgical training methodology are examined.

laurel-wreath

UM Ryder Trauma Center/ Israel fellowship program provides a model for global trauma training

UM Ryder Trauma Center’s ongoing efforts to assist in the development of sustainable global trauma systems is the focus of this article, particularly the facility’s training program for Israeli trauma surgeons.

Dr. Price

Past recipients of the ACS/Pfizer Surgical Volunteerism and Humanitarian Awards: Where are they now?

Since 2003, 38 individuals have received the ACS/Pfizer Surgical Volunteerism and Humanitarian Awards, and this article provides updates on a few past recipients and their recent accomplishments.

From left: Mayor of London Boris Johnson, Princess Lalla Salma of Morocco, Sheikha Moza, and the Duke of York.

World Innovation Summit for Health provides a global perspective on surgery

The inaugural World Innovation Summit for Health convened in Doha, Qatar, last December with more than 1,000 international delegates from 67 nations in attendance. The goal of the meeting was to identify practices and services that may contribute to the transformation of health care delivery around the globe.

Dr. Sanabria

International Guest Scholarships: An investment in surgical training around the globe

Three previous International Guest Scholars describe their experiences at U.S. health care facilities and how this exposure to advanced operative techniques has resulted in improved patient outcomes and safer patient care in their counties of origin.

Surgical intensive care unit, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy

Surgeons lead educational program to improve kidney care in Vietnam

In this article, the authors describe how they used a scholarship from the Vietnam Education Foundation to develop an educational course designed to improve care and outcomes of patients with kidney disease. The evolution of this type of training program and its role in global health care also are presented.

Figure 1: Map of Africa emphasizing the large land area (Used with permission from Collins Maps.)

Task shifting overcomes the limitations of volunteerism in developing nations

Task shifting—which involves training nonphysician clinicians in the provision of basic medical and surgical care—has been successfully used in several resource-poor countries to address workface shortages. This article examines the magnitude of the global surgical disease crisis, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, discusses the limitations of volunteerism, and recommends greater use of task shifting to better address this issue.

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