Tag Archive for ‘ACS history’

John Staige Davis

The book that established plastic surgery in the U.S.

Marking the 100th anniversary of Plastic Surgery: Its Principles and Practice, this month’s column looks at the development of this textbook as it relates to the evolution of the subspecialty of plastic surgery.

Johns Hopkins Hospital Nurses in World War I, wearing gas masks, 1918

J.M.T. Finney, MD, FACS, and AEF Base Hospital No. 18 in WWI

Dr. Finney’s leadership as Director of Base Hospital No. 18 during World War I is the focus of this month’s column.

AMEDD advance gas aid station

The U.S. medical response to gas warfare in World War I

The evolution of treating chemical-related wartime casualties, specifically gas-related injuries, starting with World War I, is detailed.

Biography of C. Rollins Hanlon, MD, FACS, Past-Director of the ACS

Biography of C. Rollins Hanlon, MD, FACS, Past-Director of the ACS, now available

C. Rollins Hanlon, MD, FACS, ACS Past-Director of the College, is the focus of a recently published biography.

ACS Archives

The College, surgeons, and the Great War

Highlights the College’s efforts to prepare its American Fellows to treat patients during World War I.

Franklin Martin, MD, FACS, Founder of the American College of Surgeons

The rescue of Miss Inez Stone

The safe return of a relative of Franklin H. Martin, MD, FACS, after Germany’s declaration of war on Russia in 1914, is the focus of this month’s column.

Dr. Gillies

The Great War and the evolution of plastic and reconstructive surgery

The early growth of plastic and reconstructive surgery, and the influence of World War I military tactics on the development of the specialty, are discussed.

ACS News

New oral histories added to the ACS Archives

The oral histories of ACS Past-Presidents have been updated to capture the reflections of the four most recent ACS Presidents.

Guy de Chauliac

Guy de Chauliac and “What the Surgeon Ought to Be”

The origin of the “What the Surgeon Ought to Be” prints, distributed to young surgeons in the mid-1950s, is summarized.

The assassination of President James Garfield: Could he have survived?

The assassination of President James A. Garfield and the lessons learned from this event are the focus of this month’s column.

President Eisenhower receiving his honorary ACS Fellowship in the White House with his medical team, February 6, 1958 From left: Dr. Snyder; Dr. Blades; Dr. Heaton; Dr. Lyons; President Eisenhower; Dr. Ravdin; Frank Berry, MD; and Robert Cutler Source: University Archives, University of Pennsylvania, Ravdin Papers, Box 14, Folder 4

President Eisenhower and his bowel obstruction

The College’s supporting role in treating President Eisenhower’s small bowel obstruction is described.

The covert operations performed on President Grover Cleveland

President Cleveland’s secret operation performed aboard a friend’s private yacht is the focus of this month’s column.

President Johnson showing his scar to reporters

Politics and the president’s gallbladder

The political implications of President Johnson’s gallbladder surgery in 1965 are described.

Dr. Ladd (Photo: Boston Children’s Hospital Archives, MA)

The Halifax Explosion and the unofficial birth of pediatric surgery

Dr. Ladd’s involvement in the Halifax Explosion and the launch of pediatric surgery as a specialty is highlighted.

Dr. Yancey in an undated portrait (Asa G. Yancey papers, circa 1940-2013, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University)

Dr. Asa Yancey and the realization of his mentor’s dream

The legacy and achievements of Asa Yancey, MD, FACS, are the focus of this month’s column.

Three generations of Harry Richter, MDs. The infant, Dr. Harry Richter III, is flanked at left by his father Dr. Harry Richter, Jr., and his grandfather, Dr. Harry Richter, Sr.

A family tradition: Fellows describe influence of surgeon parents and other relatives

Generations of practicing surgeons are profiled in this article, including descendants of the original founders of the College.

Dr. and Mrs. Leffall in 1994, when Dr. Leffall was elected ACS President.

Dr. and Mrs. LaSalle D. Leffall, Jr.: Paying it forward

The philanthropic and leadership legacy of LaSalle D. Leffall, Jr., MD, FACS, Past-President of the ACS, is the focus of this month’s column.

Dr. and Mrs. Jurkiewicz at his installation as the 70th ACS President in 1989.

Dr. and Mrs. M. J. Jurkiewicz: A distinctive legacy of giving

The focus of this month’s column is the legacy of M.J. “Josh” Jurkiewicz, MD, FACS, a former ACS President and a member of the Mayne Heritage Society.

Earl Mayne, MD, FACS

The Mayne legacy: A look back at an influential charter member of the ACS

Dr. Mayne’s surgical career and philanthropic leadership are highlighted in this article.

Franklin Martin, MD, FACS, Founder of the American College of Surgeons

American surgical history: Finding a home at the Clinical Congress

The ACS Surgical History Group continues to highlight surgical history as an integral part of the Clinical Congress educational programming with Factors Shaping Surgery over the 20th Century II, which follows up on a session the group presented last year at Clinical Congress.

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