2006

We have compiled past issues of the Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons and listed features for each issue. You can view the additional content and full issues of the Bulletin by clicking on the month or cover image.

Bulletin January 2006January

Volume 91, Issue 1

  • Introducing e-FACS.org: College launches Web portal for its members
  • Current Procedural Terminology: Changes for 2006
  • Highlights of the 91st annual Clinical Congress
  • Report of the Chair of the Board of Regents
  • Report of the Chair of the Board of Governors
  • Report of the Executive Director
  • ACS Officers and Regents

 


Bulletin February 2006February

Volume 91, Issue 2

  • Error reduction through team leadership: Applying aviation’s CRM model in the OR
  • Voluntary quality reporting program initiated for physicians
  • Political crisis and access to health care: A Nepalese neurosurgical experience
  • Fire-safe cigarettes: Reducing the hazards of smoking
  • Statement in support of legislation regarding fire-safe cigarettes

 


Bulletin March 2006March

Volume 91, Issue 3

  • Accreditation of education institutes by the American College of Surgeons: A new program following an old tradition
  • A new tool for professional development: The ACS Case Log System
  • ACS and AMA: Different organizations working together
  • In their own words: Serving as an ACS delegate to the AMA
  • Surgical lifestyles: Cross-country cancer advocacy on a bicycle
  • Ten specialty boards report accomplishments and plans, Part I

 


Bulletin April 2006April

Volume 91, Issue 4

  • Hurricane Katrina: Surgeon survivors recount days of calamity and camaraderie
  • Transitions in surgical training: The path to surgical leadership in the making of a “good” surgeon
  • Doctors for Medical Liability Reform: 2005 update and prospects for 2006
  • Role of the rural general surgeon in a statewide trauma system: The Wyoming experience
  • Ten specialty boards report accomplishments and plans, Part II

 


Bulletin May 2006May

Volume 91, Issue 5

  • Time to lend a hand: A proposal for a military medical think tank
  • America needs a new system of medical justice
  • Surgical lifestyles: Retirees reflect
  • Surgical lifestyles: My last stitch
  • Surgical lifestyles: The privilege of caring: An open letter to medical students everywhere
  • Expanding advocacy activities in state affairs
  • Surgery and global health: The perspective of UCSF residents on training, research, and service
  • Surgery and global health: A mandate for training, research, and service—A faculty perspective from the UCSF

 


Bulletin June 2006June

Volume 91, Issue 6

  • From the surgical suite to the state capitol: Fellows elected to state and local posts
  • Surgical patient education: Transformation to a system that supports full patient participation
  • Surgical lifestyles: Discovering life’s “chapter two” after surgery
  • Error reduction through team leadership: Seven principles of CRM applied to surgery
  • “Lion heart”: Saleh Khalef
  • Governors’ Committee on Chapter Activities: Update
  • Management of complex extremity trauma

 


Bulletin July 2006July

Volume 91, Issue 7

  • Report on the activities of the RAS-ACS
  • Nostalgia—The enemy of progress in the new era of surgery: An introduction to special contributions from the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons
  • The surgical training gap: The new era of the surgical trainee
  • New trends in general surgery training: Creating new training environments to maximize the resident experience
  • Impact of fellowships on surgical training
  • The elusiveness of mentorship for surgeons: Prologue
  • The pathway to mentorship
  • Filling mentorship voids
  • Epilogue: Why does mentorship fail?
  • Acute care surgery: Enhancing outcomes or fragmenting care?
  • 2006 Clinical Congress preliminary program

 


Bulletin August 2006August

Volume 91, Issue 8

  • A growing crisis in patient access to emergency surgical care
  • Surgeon, heal thyself
  • Anesthesiologist assistants: Making the operating room more accessible and manageable
  • ACS leadership in the field of sport concussion
  • Statement on principles of patient education

 


Bulletin September 2006September

Volume 91, Issue 9

  • State legislatures wrap it up for 2006
  • Rank and file weighs in on trauma and general surgery issues: Results from a survey of ACS Fellows
  • Fundamentals of prudent investing
  • Finance update
  • SAM holds organizational meeting: Working to advise the College’s new mutual fund
  • Improve your financial health: Sessions of special interest at the 2006 Clinical Congress
  • Statement on insurance, alcohol-related injuries, and trauma centers

 


Bulletin October 2006October

Volume 91, Issue 10

  • Building a safer system is a priority for AMA president, William G. Plested III
  • Surgeons on the move: “All politics is local”: The importance of grassroots advocacy
  • Surgeons on the move: The power of organization: A report on the experience of the Indiana Obesity Coalition
  • Reply to a trial lawyer
  • Surgeon works to manage medicine across vast distances

 


Bulletin November 2006November

Volume 91, Issue 11

  • A growing crisis in patient access to emergency care: A different interpretation and alternative solutions
  • Health care competition in Georgia: Still restricted for general surgeons
  • Error reduction through team leadership: The surgeon as a leader
  • Equipment for ambulances
  • Program for Accreditation of Education Institutes becomes a reality
  • Murphy Memorial Building restored

 


Bulletin December 2006December

Volume 91, Issue 12

  • Presidential Address: The role of a mentor in creating a surgical way of life
  • Surgery’s future under Medicare? The College proposes effort to reform Medicare payment structure
  • Surgical lifestyles: From the operating room to the stables: Surgeon “makes rounds” at ranch

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