Members in the news

Dr. Bowyer (right) receiving the Robert Danis Prize from Marco Patti, MD, FACS, president of the ISS/SIC (Photo: ISS/SIC)

Dr. Bowyer (right) receiving the Robert Danis Prize from Marco Patti, MD, FACS, president of the ISS/SIC (Photo: ISS/SIC)

Mark W. Bowyer, MD, FACS, Chair of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Committee on Trauma’s Surgical Skills Committee, received the 2017 Robert Danis Prize from the International Society of Surgery/Société Internationale de Chirurgie (ISS/SIC) at the 2017 World Congress of Surgery in Basel, Switzerland. This award is presented to a surgeon who has made important contributions to trauma, burns, or critical care. Dr. Bowyer was selected for his “broad contributions to the field of trauma covering all aspects from basic and clinical science research to clinical application and futuristic planning,” according to the society’s announcement.

Dr. Bowyer, the Ben Eiseman Professor of Surgery and surgical director of simulation, division of trauma and combat surgery, department of surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences–Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, spent more than 22 years as an Air Force surgeon. He has taught trauma skills to medical students and physicians the world over and served as the U.S. Air Force’s “trauma czar” while deployed in Iraq.

Dr. Deane

Dr. Deane

Stephen A. Deane, MB, BS, FACS, a general surgeon in Fennell Bay, New South Wales, Australia, was appointed a Member in the Order of Australia (AM) in June for significant service to medicine in the field of trauma surgery.

As a clinician and academic, Dr. Deane was instrumental in improving trauma surgery outcomes in Westmead Hospital, New South Wales, and around the world. He recognized that trauma specialists should interact with patients as soon as they arrive in the hospital, rather than called in after excessive time has passed since an injury occurred. To that end, Dr. Deane imported the ACS Advanced Trauma Life Support® course to help train Australian surgeons in effective trauma care. Through the International Association for Trauma Surgery and Intensive Care, he also co-developed the Definitive Surgical Trauma Care course, now operational in approximately 30 countries.

Dr. Isaacs

Dr. Isaacs

Richard A. Isaacs, MD, FACS, assumed new roles as the chief executive officer (CEO) of the Permanente Medical Group and president and CEO of the Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group in June. The Permanente Medical Group and Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group are two of the largest medical groups in the nation, with more than 10,000 physicians delivering care to nearly 5 million Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California, Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

Dr. Isaacs, an otolaryngologist who received his bachelor’s degree from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and his doctor of medicine degree from Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, has served as physician-in-chief with the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center, CA, since 2005. In that position, Dr. Isaacs played a critical leadership role in helping his medical staff pioneer several initiatives that Kaiser Permanente adopted nationwide, including the implementation of an electronic health record system.

Dr. Laronga

Dr. Laronga

Christine Laronga, MD, FACS, was elected president of the Association of Women Surgeons in December 2016 for a one-year term. Dr. Laronga is a senior member of the Comprehensive Breast Program at the Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, and Secretary of the Florida Chapter of the ACS. Her other leadership roles include serving as an ACS Governor, the Florida State Chair for the Commission on Cancer, and on the Florida Division Board of the American Cancer Society.

Dr. Laronga is a principal investigator for studies on several significant surgical procedures, including nipple- and areola-sparing mastectomy and liposuction for arm lymphedema from breast cancer treatment. She also is a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network breast cancer risk reduction panel that reviews guidelines for treating women at risk for breast cancer.

Dr. Liepert

Dr. Liepert

Amy E. Liepert, MD, FACS, an acute care surgeon and assistant professor of surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, received the Wisconsin Medical Society Foundation’s Kenneth M. Viste, Jr., MD, Young Physician Leadership Award earlier this year. The award is presented annually to a young physician who demonstrates commitment to patients, the medical profession, and the community.

The award recognized Dr. Liepert’s success in engaging physicians and legislators in the discussion of issues relevant to patients and surgeons. As a member of the ACS Health Policy and Advocacy Group, Dr. Liepert has been a leader in efforts to prioritize the College’s advocacy goals.

Dr. Moalem

Dr. Moalem

Jacob Moalem, MD, FACS, endocrine surgeon and associate professor of surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, NY, received the Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester’s Elmer Louis Award in June for his efforts to bring the Stop the Bleed® program to the Rochester area. The award specifically recognizes a program that is of broad social significance and has had a significant impact on the Jewish community—in this case, Stop the Bleed.

The goal of Stop the Bleed is to ensure that public institutions have bleeding control stations in the event of a life-threatening bleeding emergency, as prompt control of bleeding is the single most important predictor of survival in such an event. Dr. Moalem brought the program to Rochester, raised funds to purchase bleeding control kits, and scheduled training sessions at local Jewish community centers.

Dr. Santin (center) receiving his honor from Senators Peterson (left) and Tavares (right)

Dr. Santin (center) receiving his honor from Senators Peterson (left) and Tavares (right)

Brian Santin, MD, FACS, RPVI, a vascular surgeon in private practice and president, Ohio Vein & Vascular, Inc., Wilmington, OH, was recognized by the Ohio Senate in July for his patient and physician advocacy efforts. This honor is bestowed upon physicians who have gone beyond providing clinical treatment to their patients by advocating for the well-being of the profession, patients, and communities they serve. State Sens. Charleta Tavares (D) and Bob Peterson (R) recognized Dr. Santin for his work.

Dr. Santin has testified before the Ohio House Finance Subcommittee on Health and Human Services to oppose changes to health care delivery to patients who qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid and has been involved in other Ohio health care advocacy efforts. He is an at-large councilor for the Ohio State Medical Association and Membership Committee Chair for the Ohio Chapter of the ACS.

Dr. Udwadia (left) receiving the Padma Bhushan from then-Indian President Mukherjee (right)

Dr. Udwadia (left) receiving the Padma Bhushan from then-Indian President Mukherjee (right)

Tehemton E. Udwadia, MB, BS, FACS(Hon), a gastroenterologic surgeon in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, was awarded the Padma Bhushan, the third-highest civilian honor in India, for his contributions to Indian medicine. The award is conferred for service in any field rendered by government servants, including physicians and scientists. Dr. Udwadia received the award from then-President of India Pranab Mukherjee.

In 1972, Dr. Udwadia became the first surgeon to perform laparoscopic surgery in India, which led to him being known as the nation’s “father of laparoscopy surgery.” He also was the first surgeon to perform a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the developing world. He was the founding president of the Indian Association of Gastrointestinal Endo-Surgeons (1993−1998), and in 2004 the organization awarded him their Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Udwadia was previously awarded the Padma Shri, India’s fourth-highest civilian honor, for his medical service.

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